Gluten Free Chocolate Mango Loaf – no added sugar

I have adapted my Chocolate Loaf, to use mango instead of pear, I have also adjusted ingredients so there is no added sugar (the original loaf used maple syrup – which does count as added sugar).

**Note having tasted it we decided it was ok – but the recipe needs work ***

Ingredients

  • 100g gluten free plain flour
  • 30g UK corn flour
  • 60g teff flour
  • 2 rounded tbsp cocoa powder
  • 1 tsp each of: gf Baking powder, bicarbonate of soda and xanthan gum
  • 60g ground flaxseeds
  • 200g ripe mango
  • 175g natural yogurt
  • 2 large eggs, beaten
  • 70 ml vegetable oil
  • 50 ml milk

Method

  1. Heat the oven to fan 160 C (conventional 180 C )
  2. Grease a 2lb/900g loaf tin, and line with baking parchment/greaseproof paper
  3. Sieve the flours, cocoa, baking powder, bicarb and xanthan, add the flax seeds and stir well.
  4. Blitz the mango to a puree. Then add to the flour mixture.
  5. Beating the flour mixture add all the other ingredients (one by one).
  6. Bake for 60 minutes, until the top is firm and springy. If it feels liquid inside it needs cooking longer – if necessary cover the top with foil to stop it over browning.

I used thawed frozen mango.

Testing

When the cake came out of the oven it had risen more than previous loaves.

The cake was definitely edible, but seemed more like a bread than a cake. I am not sure if it was the mango that didn’t add sweetness as other fruit does, or the complete lack of sugar. So the is going down as a version not to be made again!

Gluten Free Tea Bread No Added Sugar Take 2

Having made a gluten free tea bread with no added sugar. I decided to try and make it with slightly different ingredients.

Ingredients

  • 200 ml tea (traditional or fruit)
  • 200g currants/sultanas (or other dried fruit)
  • 45 ml oil
  • ~350g of ripe pears (I use 2)
  • 25g teff flour
  • 25g UK cornflour/US cornstarch
  • 60g GF flour
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 1/2 tsp xanthan gum
  • pinch of salt
  • 40g ground flax seeds (linseed)
  • 2 eggs beaten

Method

  • Put dried fruit and oil in a bowl, pour over hot tea, allow to cool.
  • Heat oven to 160 C fan (180 C conventional), prepare a 2lb/900g loaf tin (grease and line with parchment).
  • Blitz the pear including the skin, but not the core.
  • Sieve flours, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda, xanthan gum, salt. Add the flax seeds. Stir well to ensure mixed.
  • Combine flour mixture, cooled fruit (including any excess liquid), mashed banana and beaten eggs to create a smooth thick batter.
  • Pour into lined loaf tin.
  • Bake for about 65 minutes, until an inserted skewer comes out clean. If the top starts to brown, cover with tin foil.
  • Cool in the tin, store in a cake tin or slice and freeze. Should keep for about 1 week – if not eaten.

Testing

Just tried it – and quite acceptable – I suspect there was more tea than needed. Next time I’ll take that back to 180ml. The pear seemed to work well, not sure whether to try mixing with banana. I might also increase the quantity of flax seeds to about 60g.

Gluten Free Chocolate Loaf

Having read easy gluten free, I was introduced to new ingredients including ground flaxseeds, my local supermarket didn’t appear to have them, but I asked in Waitrose and was directed to the Free-From section – where I found Linwood’s at some £5.75 for 425g. I have since found out Waitrose sell Linseed (which is the same thing) for £2.25 for 500g, but that appears to not be milled – this needs more investigation…
I added some of these flaxseeds to my No Added Sugar Gluten Free Tea Bread, and then I decided to adapt one of the muffin recipes in the book (Blueberry Muffins) to a chocolate loaf. My recipe is quite a long way from the original, so here it is:

Ingredients

  • 130g gluten free plain flour
  • 60g teff flour
  • 2 rounded tbsp cocoa powder
  • 1 tsp each of: gf Baking powder, bicarbonate of soda and xanthan gum
  • 20g ground flaxseeds
  • 2 ripe pears ~ 170g peeled
  • 125g natural yogurt
  • 2 large eggs, beaten
  • 70 ml vegetable oil
  • 70 ml maple syrup

Method

  1. Heat the oven to fan 160 C (conventional 180 C )
  2. Grease a 2lb/900g loaf tin, and line with baking parchment/greaseproof paper
  3. Sieve the flours, cocoa, baking powder, bicarb and xanthan, add the flax seeds and stir well.
  4. Peel the pears and remove the centres, blitz. Then add to the flour mixture.
  5. Beating the flour mixture add all the other ingredients (one by one).
  6. Bake for 60 minutes, until the top is firm and springy. If it feels liquid inside it needs cooking longer – if necessary cover the top with foil to stop it over browning.

The bottle of maple syrup said it contained 63g sugar per 100g, so 70 ml probably contains ~100g added sugar. So it probably is ~5g added sugar for a child size slice. Maple syrup is not as bad as white sugar, but still it would be worth experimenting to see if this can be reduced.

I peeled the pears, but I think that it would be worth trying to blitz with the skins, the centres would still need removing.

Testing

I tried this with the family and everyone liked it. The little ones wolfed their slices down. A definite success.

Gluten Free Tea Bread No Added Sugar

Having made Gluten Free Tea Bread several times with a small amount of added sugar, I thought the time had come to try it with no added sugar. I had bought some ground flax seeds, and decided to try adding that instead of sugar, the mixture was a bit stiffer than usual so I added two tablespoons of milk.

Ingredients

  • 160 ml tea (traditional or fruit)
  • 220g currants/sultanas (or other dried fruit)
  • 45 ml oil
  • ~170g ripe bananas (1½ medium bananas)
  • 25g teff flour
  • 25g UK cornflour/US cornstarch
  • 60g GF flour
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 1/2 tsp xanthan gum
  • pinch of salt
  • 20g ground flax seeds (linseed)
  • 2 eggs beaten
  • 2 tbsp milk

Method

  • Put dried fruit and oil in a bowl, pour over hot tea, allow to cool.
  • Heat oven to 160 C fan (180 C conventional), prepare a 2lb/900g loaf tin (grease and line with parchment).
  • Blitz the banana to mash (or mash with a fork).
  • Sieve flours, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda, xanthan gum, salt. Add the flax seeds. Stir well to ensure mixed.
  • Combine flour mixture, cooled fruit, mashed banana, beaten eggs and milk to create a smooth thick batter.
  • Pour into lined loaf tin.
  • Bake for about 65 minutes, until an inserted skewer comes out clean. If the top starts to brown, cover with tin foil.
  • Cool in the tin, store in a cake tin or slice and freeze. Should keep for about 1 week – if not eaten.

Testing

I have made two tea breads, one with this recipe and one with a small amount of added sugar. I am going to see if I can get the family to do a taste test. I’ll add their comments later.

My two loaf tins are not identical, but are similar sized 2lb/900g tins. The “no added sugar” version is the lighter coloured one on the right. They were cooked together in a fan oven.

Comments from testers (added 16/4/2019)

The family liked both tea breads, and there were no adverse comments. The children were still asking for it after both had run out.

However I thought the version without any sugar was less moist than the one with. I am going to tweak ingredients in an effort to improve.

Gluten Free Tea Bread Later attempts

This is a revised recipe I have tried several times, and all loaves where eaten with no complaints. I have reduced the sugar to 20g, and used more banana ~170g – depending what is in the fruit bowl that is about one and a half bananas. Once when we had some pears going soft I used them instead and that worked fine.

Ingredients

  • 160 ml tea (traditional or fruit)
  • 220g currants/sultanas (or other dried fruit)
  • 20g brown sugar
  • 45 ml oil
  • ~170g ripe bananas (1½ medium bananas)
  • 25g teff flour
  • 25g UK cornflour/US cornstarch
  • 60g GF flour
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 1/2 tsp xanthan gum
  • pinch of salt
  • 2 eggs beaten

Method

  • Put dried fruit, sugar and oil in a bowl, pour over hot tea, allow to cool.
  • Heat oven to 160 C fan, prepare a 2lb/900g loaf tin (grease and line with parchment).
  • Blitz the banana to mash (or mash with a fork).
  • Sieve flours, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda, xanthan gum, salt. Stir well to ensure mixed.
  • Combine flour mixture, cooled fruit, mashed banana and beaten eggs to create a smooth thick batter.
  • Pour into lined loaf tin.
  • Bake for about 65 minutes, until an inserted skewer comes out clean. If the top starts to brown, cover with tin foil.
  • Cool in the tin, store in a cake tin or slice and freeze. Should keep for about 1 week – if not eaten.

This version has 20g of added sugar, which is about 1g for a child sized slice.

Book #11 “easy gluten-free”

I received this book for Mother’s Day, it is sub-titled “simple recipes for delicious food everyday”, the book is a collection of recipes from some 16 authors, some have only contributed one recipe, other have contributed over 20. One of the author’s who contributed a great deal is Victoria Hall who wrote This Is Gluten Free. Her recipes in this book include some of those I tried when I had her book out of the library, and others (like her hot water pastry) I was intending to try, so this is a very useful book to own. There are a few other recipes that I think the children will like, including muffins, that can also be baked in a loaf tin.

The book itself is beautiful, with each recipe fitting on one page, and opposite each recipe a picture of the dish.

The introductory section is spread over two pages, and is brief compared to many gluten free cook books. But the information usually included in such lengthy introductions is widely available elsewhere, the only thing I felt would be useful to me was a bit of explanation about the wide range of flours and other ingredients used by the various authors, along with suggested substitutes for ingredients not widely available.

Book #9 “The Eat Well Cookbook” by Jan Purser and Kathy Snowball

I borrowed this book from the local library. Its subtitle “Dairy-free and gluten-free recipes for food lovers” appealed to me, and a flick through the pages showed detailed recipes.

On more detailed reading I found it not really suitable for me. A lot of the baked goods used “gluten-free gluten substitute”, I had not seen this in any shops and an Internet search revealed it was not currently available in the UK (I could import it). The authors say in the glossary if it is not available you can use Xanthan gum, and that the reader should “check the instructions on the packet, but generally allow 1/2 teaspoon for a cake…”

The meals suggested weren’t particularly suited to young children – but to be fair the author didn’t suggest this book was aimed at producing meals for youngsters.